PSA: Thank Your Mentor Day

Thank you to everyone in our group and in our community who has served as a mentor – your impact makes a difference in the lives of others!

This annual day of reflection and gratitude is a great opportunity to think about the impact of mentorship, show appreciation to those who have mentored us, consider ways to become mentors, and to encourage youth in our lives to think about finding mentorship and becoming mentors themselves.

Thinking about mentoring or finding a mentor?  Do a search for mentorship opportunities in your local community today, and be part of this network of kindness that is transforming lives.  There are mentoring programs for at-risk youth, otherly abled individuals, peer mentorship, young professionals, women professionals, international students, reverse-mentoring for young folks to help (us) older professionals with technology and changing culture, and more.

As a highlight of National Mentoring Month 2016, Thank Your Mentor Day™ will be celebrated January 21. On that day, many Americans will reach out to thank or honor those individuals who encouraged and guided them, and had a lasting, positive impact on their lives.

Simple ways to thank a mentor:

• Contact them directly to express your appreciation;

• Express your gratitude on social media with a message and use #SomeoneWhoMatters and #MentoringWorks;

• Pass on what you received by becoming a mentor to a young person in your community;

• Make a financial contribution to a local mentoring program in your mentor’s honor; and,

• Write a tribute to your mentor for posting on the Who Mentored You? website.

• Bring a youth group together to write thank you cards to mentors to reinforce the importance of mentorship, and inspire them to be mentors themselves.

You can download a thank you card and other Thank a Mentor Day marketing materials.

*Thank Your Mentor Day™ is an initiative of the Harvard School of Public Health.

Anyone can benefit from a mentor – many individuals in professional fields gain personal and business advantage through working with peer and professional mentoring.

But for those of you who have taken the initiative to be a mentor to youth, here is some of your impact:

Young people who were at-risk for not completing high school but who had a mentor reported higher educational aspirations and matriculation into post-secondary education, as well as greater engagement in positive activities. They were:

•55% more likely to be enrolled in college than those who did not have a mentor.

•81% more likely to report participating regularly in sports or extracurricular activities.

•More than twice as likely to say they held a leadership position in a club or sports team.

•78% more likely to volunteer regularly in their communities.

•Nearly nine in ten respondents who had a mentor said they are now interested in becoming mentors

 

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